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The Hypocrisy of Allowing Islamic Prayer in Schools

September 23, 2011

Freedom of Religion, Liberty

Religious Tolerance is such a misunderstood concept.  It was meant to mean we should be tolerant of all religion, yet it was perverted a long time ago.  That perversion has only become more extreme in the post-9/11 era.

Take, for example, the case of Mr. Jody McLoud.  In 2000, Mr. McLoud was the Principal of Roane County High School in Kingston, Tennessee.

The United States Supreme Court had recently ruled that prayer in school was against the law.  Ludicrous, of course, but the highest court in the land is often out of touch with reality.

In their ruling Santa Fe Independent School District v. Doe, they said:

The Court bases its conclusion that the true purpose of the policy is to endorse student prayer on its view of the school district’s history of Establishment Clause violations and the context in which the policy was written, that is, as “the latest step in developing litigation brought as a challenge to institutional practices that unquestionably violated the Establishment Clause.”

In a word… Bullshit.

Outside of the Second Amendment, the so-called Establishment Clause of the First Amendment is probably the most misunderstood and misapplied Amendment of the US Constitution!

The wall of separation is not in law (in principle, not practice) nor Constitution.  It WAS in a letter – Thomas Jefferson’s Jan 1, 1802 letter, called the Wall of Separation Letter, was to the Danbury Baptist Association.

The Danbury Baptist Association of Danbury, Connecticut sent a letter, dated October 7, 1801, to the newly elected President Thomas Jefferson, expressing concern over the lack in their state constitution of explicit protection of religious liberty, and against a government establishment of religion.

The Danbury Baptist Association’s religious beliefs were that church and state had to be separate.

They wrote, “Our Sentiments are uniformly on the side of Religious Liberty — That Religion is at all times and places a matter between God and individuals — That no man ought to suffer in name, person, or effects on account of his religious Opinions — That the legitimate Power of civil government extends no further than to punish the man who works ill to his neighbor…”

Jefferson wrote back that he concurred with them. This is not law, however, legal precedent has observed the alleged wall for most of the 20th century. In theory this should mean that the state has no influence to control religion, in practice this is not so. It has also been taken to mean that when a conservative candidate speaks in a church or to a religious audience, leftists cry and whine. When a libtard speaks to a religious group somewhere, its ok.

In response to that asinine ruling, Principal Jody McLoud gave the following speech:

It has always been the custom at Roane County High School football games to say a prayer and play the National Anthem to honor God and Country.

Due to a recent ruling by the Supreme Court, I am told that saying a prayer is a violation of Federal Case Law.

As I understand the law at this time, I can use this public facility to approve of sexual perversion and call it an alternate lifestyle, and if someone is offended, that’s OK.

I can use it to condone sexual promiscuity by dispensing condoms and calling it safe sex. If someone is offended, that’s OK.

I can even use this public facility to present the merits of killing an unborn baby
as a viable means of birth control. If someone is offended, it’s no problem.

I can designate a school day as earth day and involve students in activities to religiously worship and praise the goddess, mother earth, and call it ecology.

I can use literature, videos and presentations in the classroom that depict people with strong, traditional, Christian convictions as simple minded and ignorant and call it enlightenment.

However, if anyone uses this facility to honor God and ask Him to bless this event with safety and good sportsmanship, Federal Case Law is violated.

This appears to be inconsistent at best, and at worst, diabolical.

Apparently, we are to be tolerant of everything and anyone except God and His Commandments.

Nevertheless, as a school principal, I frequently ask staff and students to abide by rules that they do not necessarily agree. For me to do otherwise would be inconsistent at best, and at worst, hypocritical. I suffer from that affliction enough unintentionally. I certainly do not need to add an intentional transgression.

For this reason, I shall render unto Caesar that which is Caesar’s and refrain from praying at this time. However, if you feel inspired to honor, praise and thank God, and ask Him in the name of Jesus to bless this event, please feel free to do so. As far as I know, that’s not against the law — yet.

Showing their appreciation for the speech as well as their own private religious conviction, one by one, the people in the stands bowed their heads, held hands with one another, and began to pray.

They prayed in the stands.

They prayed in the team huddles.

They prayed at the concession stand, and they prayed in the announcer’s box.

The only place they didn’t pray was in the Supreme Court of the United States of America — the so-called seat of “justice” of “One Nation Under God.”

Why is this important and what’s it got to do with the title of this article?

Everything.

For today in America, while Christians are forbidden to pray in schools, devotees of Islam are not only allowed, but encouraged to pray in schools.

That is nothing if not hypocrisy at it’s best.

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About Christopher di Armani

Christopher di Armani is a freelance writer and filmmaker who resides in Lytton, BC, Canada, with his wife Lynda, their dog Koda and cat, Goofball. Christopher is a strong believer in the most basic of individual human rights, the right of free speech and the right of self defense, which includes the corollary right to acquire, possess and use the tools necessary to exercise those rights. Christopher strives to awaken the passion for liberty that exists inside every person. It is this passion that motivates him in every aspect of his life.

View all posts by Christopher di Armani

One Response to “The Hypocrisy of Allowing Islamic Prayer in Schools”

  1. Don Laird Says:

    Good article Christopher…

    Its not just hypocrisy…..its an offense and an act of provocative aggression and it will get the reaction it seeks….sooner or later….

    Here is a prayer from Pastor Joe Wright. Pastor Wright was asked to give the opening prayer at the Kansas State House of Representatives in 1996, he did as below….a few men walked out, most stayed and listened to these words of truth, and truer words were never spoken…..

    Enjoy!!…….

    Heavenly Father, we come before You today to ask Your forgiveness and seek Your direction and guidance. Lord, we know Your Word says, “Woe to those who call evil good,” but that’s exactly what we’ve done. We have lost our spiritual equilibrium and inverted our values.

    We confess that we have ridiculed the absolute truth of Your Word and called it moral pluralism.

    We have worshipped other gods and called it multi-culturalism.

    We have endorsed perversion and called it an alternative lifestyle.

    We have exploited the poor and called it the lottery.

    We have neglected the needy and called it self-preservation.

    We have rewarded laziness and called it welfare.

    We have killed our unborn and called it choice.

    We have shot abortionists and called it justifiable.

    We have neglected to discipline our children and called it building esteem.

    We have abused power and called it political savvy.

    We have coveted our neighbors’ possessions and called it ambition.

    We have polluted the air with profanity and pornography and called it freedom of expression.

    We have ridiculed the time-honored values of our fore-fathers and called it enlightenment.

    Search us oh God and know our hearts today; try us and see if there be some wicked way in us; cleanse us from every sin and set us free.

    Guide and bless these men and women who have been sent here by the people of Kansas, and who have been ordained by You, to govern this great state. Grant them Your wisdom to rule and may their decisions direct us to the center of Your will. I ask it in the name of Your Son, the Living Savior, Jesus Christ.

    Amen.

    Reply

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